Oklahoma day care regulations top 5 in the nation - KSWO 7News | Breaking News, Weather and Sports

Oklahoma day care regulations top 5 in the nation

Lawton_For a working parent, child care couldn't be more important. So choosing a place to leave your kid is a tough decision. But Oklahoma parents can sleep easy knowing that their children are in some of the best hands. According to a recent national child care study, Oklahoma ranks third in the country for standards placed on child care facilities.

At day care, kids have loads of fun. But in Oklahoma, fun comes with a lot of rules. "The best standards that we live by are ratios. We have for infant care we have 1 to 4, for toddlers it's 1 to 6. They regulate how many children we can have in a building and how many children each teacher can have," said day care owner Rick Kerr.

And Oklahoma is the only state that requires 3 licensing visits a year. Some states don't even require one. "The 3 licensed visits are unannounced. They have to come in 3 times a year and check. They go through with a fine tooth comb. They look at every nook and cranny in the building. They've got a report that's about 6 pages long that they go through and check," said Kerr.

And Oklahoma law says parents can come in at any time too. "You got to have an open door policy for the parents' sake so they feel like they can come in and check and see what's going on at any given time." But he said he doesn't mind all the extra eyes in the room or the harsh regulations. "We always want things to be stricter. Because the children's, their lives are at stake here. Their education is at stake."

Texas came in twelfth on the list. New Mexico, Arkansas, and Kansas are all in the forties.

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