DA to seek death penalty in Tulsa shooting rampage - KSWO 7News | Breaking News, Weather and Sports

DA to seek death penalty in Tulsa shooting rampage

TULSA, Okla. (AP) - Tulsa prosecutors say they'll seek the death penalty against two men charged in an April 2012 shooting rampage that killed three black people and left two more wounded.

Tulsa County District Attorney Tim Harris made the announcement Friday in the case against Jake England and Alvin Watts. The two also face hate crimes charges stemming from the shootings of William Allen, Bobby Clark and Dannaer Fields.

Two others who were shot survived. The shootings happened in a predominantly black section of Tulsa, and all five victims were black.

Authorities have said England may have targeted black people because he wanted to avenge his father's shooting death by a black man two years ago.

However, England, who describes himself as Cherokee Indian, has said he has no ill-will toward black people.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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