Travel troubles after blizzard - KSWO 7News | Breaking News, Weather and Sports

Travel troubles after blizzard

Amarillo, Texas - Runways and gates are finally cleared at Rick Husband International Airport. But problems still continue for travelers who were affected by Monday's blizzard.

Travel has resumed at Amarillo's Rick Husband International Airport. Monday's blizzard caused the airport to shut down for two days.

"We're pretty much overwhelmed with the storm like everyone else. We ended up having to close both runways and that's the first time in a long long time that that's happened. Usually we could keep one open," Patrick Rhodes, Aviation Director says.

Nearly 20 inches of snow blanketed both runways of the airport causing all three airlines to cancel flights. Those canceled flights meant trouble for travelers and left Rick Husband Airport busier than usual.

"A lot of people in the terminal. Most of those are people who were booked on today's flights, but also people who did not get out and are trying to get on any seats available. So it's been a busy day," Rhodes says.

Ruth Moser was waiting to get on a flight back to Houston today. Her original flight was for Tuesday morning, but had to be rescheduled twice.

"I thought well that snow will come in and it will be over, and I'll just, you know how it is, they always clear it off for you to get out here Tuesday morning at 11 o'clock. That was canceled and then the afternoon flight was canceled. But it's just another day."

But, it wasn't just another day for a Borger woman. She had been stuck in Denver, Colo. since Sunday.

"It's been pretty bad. I have been stranded in Denver since Sunday due to the weather storm or the snow storm over there. And then when I finally got a ticket to come into Amarillo, the blizzard hits here, so I get stranded in Denver until this morning when I was on stand by to come in," Mary Dominguez says.

Dominguez says she is happy to be back home and her view of flying has changed after this experience.

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