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Youth Protection Training

In order for you to better recognize the signs of abuse, you can go to a free training session in the upcoming weeks in Amarillo.

Parents and youth leaders in the Texas and Oklahoma Panhandles can receive free training on how to recognize when a child is being abused. Our area's Boy Scouts' organization is offering two sessions in an effort to help reduce abuse and raise awareness as April is their "Youth Protection Month".

The Golden Spread Council of Boy Scouts of America Scout Executive Andy Price says the training helps people talk more about abuse issues and offers procedures to protect adults as well. Price says,"Having two adults present whenever youth are involved. What we've seen through history is that instances of abuse occur when there's an adult and a youth, or two youths. But when there's a third party present, it's very difficult for abuse to take place."

Everyone is invited to participate in the trainings, which will be held April 2nd and April 9th. The course starts at 7 pm at the Golden Spread Council Service Center in Amarillo. It's located at 401 Tascosa Road. If you'd like to attend, you're recommended to call to reserve a spot. The number is (806) 358-6500. 

There are also free online trainings available throughout the year at: www.myscouting.org.

Jessica Abuchaibe, NewsChannel 10. 

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