Historical marker dedicated at Fisk Building in Amarillo - KSWO, Lawton, OK- Wichita Falls, TX: News, Weather, Sports. ABC, 24/7, Telemundo -

Historical marker dedicated at Fisk Building in Amarillo

Courtesy: Texas Historical Commission Courtesy: Texas Historical Commission

Amarillo, TX - An Amarillo icon almost as old as the city itself is being recognized with an historical marker.

The Fisk Building in downtown Amarillo has been standing since 1927, and it just recently took its place in the National Register of Historic Places. And local leaders and historical societies commemorated the honor Tuesday evening (May 14) with a new historical marker to pay homage to the building's place in both Texas and national history.

In the late twenties, Amarillo was in the midst of an oil boom, and local businessman Charles Fisk financed the building, which was originally used as offices for a trust company and medical professionals.

The building is particularly noted for its architecture, which has been retained throughout the building's life.  Wes Reeves, President of the Amarillo Historical Preservation Foundation, says that kind of constancy is a physical manifestation of history itself.

"Amarillo has a real distinct history, and not only our history, but our built environment reflects that history," says Reeves.  "So it's really great to be able to look at something and say, 'That reminds me of Amarillo in the 1920s or 1930s,' and it tells a story all of its own when you can take a look at a building like this."

Last year, the Fisk Building was added to the national register, which means the owners could be eligible for federal aid or tax incentives for restoration or preservation.  And historians say preservation is key to remembering our past.

"It's important, I think, for the identity of the community, to understand that we are different and unique, and we have something to prove that," says Reeves. "There's no other place in America that looks like Polk Street - people who have been gone for years can drive down here and say, 'This is Polk Street. This is the way I remember it.'"

The building currently serves as a Courtyard Marriott hotel and is owned by a company based in Dallas.

To learn more about the building or the National Register of Historic Places, follow the links attached to this story.

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