New testing technology can detect HIV two weeks after exposure - KSWO 7News | Breaking News, Weather and Sports

New testing technology can detect HIV two weeks after exposure

AMARILLO, TX - New ground breaking technology used to test for the human immunodeficiency virus will help slow the spread of the disease, and that technology is on it's way to Amarillo.

Right now a patient has to be infected with HIV for at least three months before they can test positive for it, but the new technology can detect the virus as soon as two weeks after exposure.

As of January of last year, Amarillo had only seen 13 cases of HIV. But city health officials say they're seeing an increase in Hispanic men ages 15- 24. New testing technology, though could help slow that increase across the state.

"We're able to pick up infection within about two weeks of exposure," Amarillo Assistant Public Health Director Casie Stoughton said. "This new test will be able to differentiate between HIV 1 and HIV 2, which will help practitioners in treating their patients."

Stoughton says the Department of State Health Services is working on getting the new testing technology to all public health facilities. The Amarillo public health department offers free HIV testing, and the new and improved technology will be free as well. They'll offer it soon as June of 2014.

HIV is most contagious when it's first contracted. So being able to test positive for it sooner would not only help stop the spread of the disease, but it could prolong a patient's life.

"If we can identify someone who is HIV positive early on in their disease, they can begin medical treatment, they can begin taking medication, notifying partners and hopefully reduce the spread of the HIV disease," Stoughton said.

Stoughton says anyone and everyone who is sexually active needs to get tested.

Officials from the health department will be offering free, anonymous testing at the West Texas A&M Student Center on Monday, December 2, from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. World AIDs Awareness Day is Sunday.

  • Local NewsNewsMore>>

  • Amid anti-immigrant sentiment, some Spanish speakers wary

    Amid anti-immigrant sentiment, some Spanish speakers wary

    Saturday, May 26 2018 2:14 PM EDT2018-05-26 18:14:01 GMT
    Sunday, May 27 2018 3:38 PM EDT2018-05-27 19:38:42 GMT
    (AP Photo/Chris Carlson). Lilly Mucarsel, a native of Ecuador, poses for a picture in her office Friday, May 25, 2018, in Tustin, Calif. Mucarsel, 62, of Southern California finds herself reverting to English when she attends a baseball game or goes to...(AP Photo/Chris Carlson). Lilly Mucarsel, a native of Ecuador, poses for a picture in her office Friday, May 25, 2018, in Tustin, Calif. Mucarsel, 62, of Southern California finds herself reverting to English when she attends a baseball game or goes to...

    The Trump administration's harsh rhetoric and tougher policies toward immigrants have made some Spanish speakers self-conscious about speaking other languages in public.

    The Trump administration's harsh rhetoric and tougher policies toward immigrants have made some Spanish speakers self-conscious about speaking other languages in public.

  • More LGBT issues loom as justices near wedding cake decision

    More LGBT issues loom as justices near wedding cake decision

    Saturday, May 26 2018 9:33 AM EDT2018-05-26 13:33:35 GMT
    Sunday, May 27 2018 3:38 PM EDT2018-05-27 19:38:32 GMT
    (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File). FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2017, file photo, the Supreme Court in Washington is seen at sunset. A flood of lawsuits over LGBT rights is making its way through the courts and will continue, no matter the outcome in the...(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File). FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2017, file photo, the Supreme Court in Washington is seen at sunset. A flood of lawsuits over LGBT rights is making its way through the courts and will continue, no matter the outcome in the...

    A flood of lawsuits over LGBT rights is making its way through courts and that'll continue, no matter what the Supreme Court decides in the case of a baker who wouldn't create a wedding cake for a same-sex couple.

    A flood of lawsuits over LGBT rights is making its way through courts and that'll continue, no matter what the Supreme Court decides in the case of a baker who wouldn't create a wedding cake for a same-sex couple.

  • Forgotten WWII battle raged 75 years ago on Alaska island

    Forgotten WWII battle raged 75 years ago on Alaska island

    Sunday, May 27 2018 11:34 AM EDT2018-05-27 15:34:09 GMT
    Sunday, May 27 2018 3:38 PM EDT2018-05-27 19:38:28 GMT
    (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen). In this May 19, 2018, photo World War II veterans Allan Seroll, left, of Massachusetts, and William Roy Dover, right, of Alabama, right, attend a 75th anniversary celebration of the Battle of Attu in Anchorage, Alaska. Dover w...(AP Photo/Mark Thiessen). In this May 19, 2018, photo World War II veterans Allan Seroll, left, of Massachusetts, and William Roy Dover, right, of Alabama, right, attend a 75th anniversary celebration of the Battle of Attu in Anchorage, Alaska. Dover w...

    One of the bloodiest World War II battles in the Pacific was waged 75 years ago this month on Attu Island in Alaska's Aleutian Islands.

    One of the bloodiest World War II battles in the Pacific was waged 75 years ago this month on Attu Island in Alaska's Aleutian Islands.

Powered by Frankly