Wagstaff admits to alleged sex crimes with juvenile - KSWO 7News | Breaking News, Weather and Sports

Wagstaff admits to alleged sex crimes with juvenile

LAWTON, Okla._ A former Comanche County official who was charged last week for his alleged sexual involvement with a 14-year-old boy has now admitted to the allegations.

Court documents show Clinton Wagstaff, former emergency management director, first denied any wrongdoing to detectives investigating the case. After being told what the young boy said, Wagstaff then admitted to being sexually involved with the juvenile. Wagstaff told authorities the juvenile's statements were true and said he often used his personal and work vehicle to meet the boy. Wagstaff, 61, told police he wanted to take full responsibility for his actions.

The young boy's parents were the first to alert police to the inappropriate relationship after finding Facebook messages on their son's account. The juvenile told detectives he referred to Wagstaff as his playmate, and he said Wagstaff told him no one could ever know of their relationship.

Wagstaff, who has been married to his wife for 40 years, also admitted to having other relationships with men in the past. Mrs. Wagstaff filed for divorce earlier this week citing irreconcilable differences.

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