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Lawton student ahead of the curve

LAWTON, Okla._One Lawton student is way ahead of the game and wise beyond her years.

After testing out of the 7th and 8th grade, Katelyn Locy started high school at just 12-years-old. Now at 16, she is finishing up her sophomore year at Cameron University this summer.

Katelyn's dream is to work full time as a veterinarian and part-time as a research scientist.

She is in the honors program at Cameron, maintaining a “B” average, while majoring in Agricultural Science and minoring in Chemistry.

Katelyn said she hasn't always been this motivated, but during her freshman year of high school she realized the sooner she could finish school, the sooner she could help people.

"I just noticed how a lot of people struggled, especially when it comes to food, so I was like 'okay, that's what I want to do, I want to help people," Katelyn said.

Here's how she plans to do that:

I pretty much want to give them the cheapest and best animal care that I can provide, and I want to help further the fields of research; especially when it comes to genetically modified organisms."

However, Katelyn's mom, Mariam Torres, said her daughter has always been an overachiever.

"She has been working on this since she was in 1st grade like researching what she has to do to be a vet the grades, what she needs to accomplish, she always just been driven and focused," Torres said.

But what about when she's not in class or doing homework?

"Sleep. Typical teenager, she loves to sleep," Torres said.

Katelyn is also a huge soccer fan, and works as a referee and a volunteer coach.

“I'm a Grade 7 referee, and I'm working on getting my distinguished Grade 7," Katelyn said.

Her talents don't stop there.

I can speak some Italian, German, American Sign Language, those are the main ones; and then I can speak some Japanese and a little bit of Korean and Chinese."

Katelyn says her family has been supportive since day one.

"[They] think it's pretty cool," Katelyn said.

"Oh very proud, I brag about her all the time," Torres said.

Even though she's quite an anomaly, Katelyn is not going to school on scholarship. Her family is paying for her education completely out-of-pocket.

She is on track to graduate January of 2017, and is hoping she will be accepted into the veterinary program at OSU.

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