The Latest: White House flag flying at half-staff - KSWO, Lawton, OK- Wichita Falls, TX: News, Weather, Sports. ABC, 24/7, Telemundo -

The Latest: White House flag flying at half-staff

(AP Photo/Jay Reeves). People gather at the scene of a military recruiting office in Chattanooga, Tenn., on Monday, July 20, 2015, four days after it was targeted in a pair of shootings that left five people dead. (AP Photo/Jay Reeves). People gather at the scene of a military recruiting office in Chattanooga, Tenn., on Monday, July 20, 2015, four days after it was targeted in a pair of shootings that left five people dead.
(AP Photo/Jay Reeves). Flags stand in a make-shift memorial as people gather at the scene of a military recruiting office in Chattanooga, Tenn., on Monday, July 20, 2015, four days after it was targeted in a pair of shootings that left five people dead. (AP Photo/Jay Reeves). Flags stand in a make-shift memorial as people gather at the scene of a military recruiting office in Chattanooga, Tenn., on Monday, July 20, 2015, four days after it was targeted in a pair of shootings that left five people dead.
(Dan Henry/Chattanooga Times Free Press via AP). Charlene Jacobs, right, kneels to pay her respects Monday, July 20, 2015, while at the Lee Highway memorial set up for last Thursday's Chattanooga, Tenn., shooting victims. (Dan Henry/Chattanooga Times Free Press via AP). Charlene Jacobs, right, kneels to pay her respects Monday, July 20, 2015, while at the Lee Highway memorial set up for last Thursday's Chattanooga, Tenn., shooting victims.
(Dan Henry/Chattanooga Times Free Press via AP). Bud Lewallen, left, and David Holloway fold Lewallen's personal flag on Monday, July 20, 2015, while visiting the Lee Highway memorial in Chattanooga, Tenn., Monday, July 20, 2015. (Dan Henry/Chattanooga Times Free Press via AP). Bud Lewallen, left, and David Holloway fold Lewallen's personal flag on Monday, July 20, 2015, while visiting the Lee Highway memorial in Chattanooga, Tenn., Monday, July 20, 2015.
(Dan Henry/Chattanooga Times Free Press via AP). Bryan Thaboua kneels with his 8-month-old son Cooper Thaboua on Monday, July 20, 2015, in front of the Lee Highway memorial for last Thursday's Chattanooga, Tenn., shooting victims. (Dan Henry/Chattanooga Times Free Press via AP). Bryan Thaboua kneels with his 8-month-old son Cooper Thaboua on Monday, July 20, 2015, in front of the Lee Highway memorial for last Thursday's Chattanooga, Tenn., shooting victims.

By The Associated Press

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) - The latest on the Chattanooga shootings at two military facilities:

12:45 p.m.

The U.S. flag atop the White House is flying at half-staff in remembrance of five service members who were killed in last week's Chattanooga, Tennessee shooting.

President Barack Obama issued an order Tuesday to lower the flag, following similar moves at the U.S. Capitol and even by Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump.

The order also follows criticism of the White House.

U.S. flags flown at all public buildings and grounds, including military posts, will fly at half-staff until sunset Saturday.

Four Marines and one Navy sailor were killed during shootings by 24-year-old Muhammad Youssef Abdulazeez at two Tennessee military sites.

___

11:45 a.m.

President Barack Obama says the U.S. will keep doing everything in its power to protect American military members after last week's killing of five troops in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Obama is speaking to the Veterans of Foreign Wars convention in Pittsburgh. He says the U.S. honors the four Marines and one sailor killed. He says the nation is drawing strength from Chattanooga as it sends an unmistakable message that the U.S. won't give in to fear or attempts to change the American way of life.

Obama says the U.S. must remain vigilant in protecting the homeland. He says the details about the Chattanooga attack aren't yet clear. But he says the Islamic State group and al-Qaida have encouraged attacks on U.S. soil, including against U.S. troops.

Obama says small terrorist cells and so-called "lone wolves" are hard to prevent.

___

11:25 a.m.

A lawyer says an uncle of the shooter in last week's killing of five U.S. servicemen in Tennessee has been in custody in Jordan since a day after the attack.

Abdel Qader al-Khatib told The Associated Press on Tuesday that he was barred from seeing his client and that family members were prevented from visiting. Al-Khatib identified his client as Asaad Ibrahim Abdulazeez Haj Ali, a maternal uncle of the Tennessee attacker, Muhammad Youssef Abdulazeez.

The Tennessee shooter had spent several months in Jordan last year, and a Jordanian government official said Tuesday that some of Abdulazeez' relatives in Jordan were being questioned as part of an investigation into his stay in the kingdom.

The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the case with the media, did not know if the uncle was in detention.

___

Associated Press writer Karin Laub contributed to this report.

___

7:24 a.m.

Qatar says the shooter in the killing of four Marines and a U.S. sailor in Tennessee last week transited through the Gulf state on his way back from a visit to Jordan but never set foot outside the airport.

Qatar's government media office made the comments in a statement responding to questions from The Associated Press on Tuesday following news reports that Muhammad Youssef Abdulazeez had visited the country.

The statement says Abdulazeez changed planes Doha's Hamad International Airport on his way to the United States in November 2014.

It adds that statements suggesting "Abdulazeez entered the State of Qatar are false."

Qatar has emerged as a major long-haul transit hub in the Middle East thanks to the rapid growth of government-backed Qatar Airways.

___

Associated Press writers Adam Schreck and Karin Laub contributed to this report.

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

  • Local NewsNewsMore>>

  • A CDC ban on 'fetus' and 'transgender?' Experts alarmed

    A CDC ban on 'fetus' and 'transgender?' Experts alarmed

    Saturday, December 16 2017 7:49 PM EST2017-12-17 00:49:07 GMT
    Sunday, December 17 2017 12:30 PM EST2017-12-17 17:30:31 GMT

    Health leaders say they are alarmed about reports that officials at the nation's top public health agency are being told not to use certain words in official budget documents, including "fetus," and "transgender.".

    Health leaders say they are alarmed about reports that officials at the nation's top public health agency are being told not to use certain words in official budget documents, including "fetus," and "transgender.".

  • Trump defends tax plan, proclaims economy set 'to rock'

    Trump defends tax plan, proclaims economy set 'to rock'

    Saturday, December 16 2017 3:16 AM EST2017-12-16 08:16:02 GMT
    Sunday, December 17 2017 12:30 PM EST2017-12-17 17:30:18 GMT
    (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite). House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, is pursued by reporters in the Capitol after signing the conference committee report to advance the GOP tax bill, in Washington, Friday, Dec. 15, 2017.(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite). House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, is pursued by reporters in the Capitol after signing the conference committee report to advance the GOP tax bill, in Washington, Friday, Dec. 15, 2017.

    Republicans working to execute their first major legislative achievement of Donald Trump's presidency appear to have secured the votes to pass a massive tax overhaul that Trump hoped to present to Americans. 

    Republicans working to execute their first major legislative achievement of Donald Trump's presidency appear to have secured the votes to pass a massive tax overhaul that Trump hoped to present to the American people for Christmas.

  • Special counsel obtains thousands of Trump transition emails

    Special counsel obtains thousands of Trump transition emails

    Sunday, December 17 2017 3:19 AM EST2017-12-17 08:19:20 GMT
    Sunday, December 17 2017 12:30 PM EST2017-12-17 17:30:10 GMT

    Several people familiar with President Donald Trump's transition organization say special counsel Robert Mueller's team gained access to thousands of private emails sent and received by Trump officials before his administration began.

    Several people familiar with President Donald Trump's transition organization say special counsel Robert Mueller's team gained access to thousands of private emails sent and received by Trump officials before his administration began.

Powered by Frankly