Senator Lankford speaks about oil impact in Duncan - KSWO 7News | Breaking News, Weather and Sports

Senator Lankford speaks about oil impact in Duncan

DUNCAN, Okla._U.S. Senator James Lankford heard the concerns of dozens of constituents Friday during a brief tour of the area. 

He wrapped up his visit with a town hall meeting in Duncan, after making stops in Rush Springs and Marlow. Lankford said he understands how important the oil and gas industry is in Duncan, and the potentially negative economic impact of the sinking price of oil.

"One of the big challenges we have right now is the president has spent the past year negotiating with Iran to be able to lift the sanctions on them, which allows them to sell oil in the world market. But the United States still cannot sell oil on the world market. We should be able to use our oil here in the U.S., produce it, use it, what we cannot use we should be able to sell the excess around the world, and currently we can't," Lankford said.

Lankford says many people have been asking about the Iran nuclear deal, which he opposes. You can hear more about that and other issues he's working on in Washington on "This Week in Texoma."

You'll also hear from U.S. Representative Tom Cole. The show airs Sunday morning at 5:30 a.m. on KSWO.

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