Proclamation signed in honor of Black Heritage Month - KSWO 7News | Breaking News, Weather and Sports

Proclamation signed in honor of Black Heritage Month

(Source: KSWO) (Source: KSWO)

LAWTON, OK (KSWO) - In honor of Black Heritage Month, community leaders and residents attended an event at City Hall to sign a proclamation recognizing this month and the contributions of African Americans across the country. 

It was the city's turn to host this year's Black Heritage Month signing ceremony and reception. Leaders from the seven organizations that take turns hosting the event, each signed and received a copy of the proclamation to put on display. 

Mayor Fred Fitch, Fort Sill's Commanding General Brian McKiernan, along with the leaders of five other organizations the proclamation.

The event also included musical performers and speakers sharing a message of acceptance and unification. 

Around 100 people gathered to hear that message and celebrate this month.

Lawton resident Allen Page attended Wednesday’s event to reflect reminisce on how far things have come, and how the city has become more diverse.

"It's not so much about the month it's about you know? Just the gathering of people and recognizing some of the struggles we had in the past and how far we've come as a community. Not just black and white, but as a community of all kinds of people," Page said.

Lawton Police Chief James Smith spoke at the event saying just about anything can be conquered if the community comes together and treats everybody with dignity and respect. 

"We're different but we're still one community and we're coming together to live, work, and solve all our problems together," Chief Smith said.

Mayor Fred Fitch says it's important to remember everything African Americans have contributed to both our country and the city of Lawton.  And he says we need to come together despite current racial tensions.

"We need to unify our efforts and make this country strong and work together for the betterment of this community," Fitch said.

Barbara Curry said she came out to reflect, and learn from black history so she can be a voice of change. 

And while she enjoyed the music and speakers, she wishes the audience was more diverse. 

"As a community, we need to be more supportive,” Curry said. “So, that we can break those lines down so that you and I can work together and I don't see your color but I see your heart."

A link to other Black Heritage Month events happening across the community can be found here.

Copyright 2017 KSWO. All rights reserved.

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