Oklahoma teacher raises unlikely amid state budget gap - KSWO 7News | Breaking News, Weather and Sports

Oklahoma teacher raises unlikely amid state budget gap

(Source KSWO) (Source KSWO)

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK (KWTV)- Lawmakers still agree teachers in Oklahoma need raises but leadership in the Senate doesn’t seem to think it will happen this year.

“I don’t think there’s any one silver magic bullet out there that fills our budget gap as well as provides a pay raise for teachers this year,” Senator Mike Schulz President Pro Tempore said he expects the legislature to lay the foundation for raises; but a foundation for a raise is not a raise.

According to KWTV, Lawmakers will have to find an additional $53-mllion for every thousand dollars they raise teachers’ pay on top of bridging the budget gap.

 “I appreciate the rare bit of honesty and candor coming from the House majority caucus. Because just two weeks ago, as a member of the House Appropriations Committee, we were told by the Chair of Appropriations as well as the author of the teacher pay raise bill, they absolutely believe we could do a $1,000 or $2,000 pay raise for teachers. What they’re doing is being disingenuous with the educators in this state by promising them false hope,” Representative Scott Inman (D) House Minority Leader said.

Information provided by KWTV.

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