Gay rights group praises Oklahoma Senate for derailing bills - KSWO 7News | Breaking News, Weather and Sports

Gay rights group praises Oklahoma Senate for derailing bills

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - Two bills that opponents say have led to boycotts in other states and could jeopardize Oklahoma's ability to attract major sporting events have been derailed in the Oklahoma Senate.

The Republican-controlled Senate voted 25-18 on Thursday against a bill that would have prohibited cities and towns from enacting ordinances that protect gay people from discrimination in housing and employment.

Coalgate Republican Sen. Josh Brecheen wrote the bill and says it was intended to protect people's sincerely held religious beliefs.

After the bill failed, the author of a second measure to allow businesses to discriminate against gay people withdrew his proposal.

The director of the gay rights group Freedom Oklahoma praised the Senate for its vote. Troy Stevenson said similar bills have led to boycotts in North Carolina and Indiana.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

  • Local NewsNewsMore>>

  • Dunkin' Donuts store: No 'shouting in language other than English'

    Dunkin' Donuts store: No 'shouting in language other than English'

    Monday, June 18 2018 3:16 PM EDT2018-06-18 19:16:00 GMT
    Monday, June 18 2018 3:16 PM EDT2018-06-18 19:16:00 GMT
    The sign requesting customers to report non-English shouting appeared in the window of a Baltimore Dunkin’ Donuts. (Source: Dunkin’ Donuts, file)The sign requesting customers to report non-English shouting appeared in the window of a Baltimore Dunkin’ Donuts. (Source: Dunkin’ Donuts, file)

    The sign requesting customers to report non-English shouting appeared in the window of a Baltimore Dunkin’ Donuts.

    The sign requesting customers to report non-English shouting appeared in the window of a Baltimore Dunkin’ Donuts.

  • Trump digs in on immigration amid family separation crisis

    Trump digs in on immigration amid family separation crisis

    Monday, June 18 2018 4:20 AM EDT2018-06-18 08:20:01 GMT
    Monday, June 18 2018 3:11 PM EDT2018-06-18 19:11:57 GMT
    (Butch Comegys/The Times-Tribune via AP). U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks on immigration policy and law enforcement actions at Lackawanna College in downtown Scranton, Pa., on Friday, June 15, 2018.(Butch Comegys/The Times-Tribune via AP). U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks on immigration policy and law enforcement actions at Lackawanna College in downtown Scranton, Pa., on Friday, June 15, 2018.

    Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May after Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a new "zero-tolerance" policy that refers all cases of illegal entry for criminal prosecution.

    Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May after Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a new "zero-tolerance" policy that refers all cases of illegal entry for criminal prosecution.

  • Supreme Court leaves door open to curbing partisan districts

    Supreme Court leaves door open to curbing partisan districts

    Monday, June 18 2018 10:40 AM EDT2018-06-18 14:40:07 GMT
    Monday, June 18 2018 3:11 PM EDT2018-06-18 19:11:46 GMT
    The Supreme Court is resolving partisan redistricting cases from Wisconsin and Maryland without ruling on the broader issue of whether electoral maps can give an unfair advantage to a political party. (Source: CNN)The Supreme Court is resolving partisan redistricting cases from Wisconsin and Maryland without ruling on the broader issue of whether electoral maps can give an unfair advantage to a political party. (Source: CNN)

    The Supreme Court is resolving partisan redistricting cases from Wisconsin and Maryland without ruling on the broader issue of whether electoral maps can give an unfair advantage to a political party.

    The Supreme Court is resolving partisan redistricting cases from Wisconsin and Maryland without ruling on the broader issue of whether electoral maps can give an unfair advantage to a political party.

Powered by Frankly