Prosecution of Oklahoma pipe shop leaves residents perplexed - KSWO 7News | Breaking News, Weather and Sports

Prosecution of Oklahoma pipe shop leaves residents perplexed

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By SEAN MURPHY
Associated Press

NORMAN, Okla. (AP) - The Republican district attorney in the college down of Norman, Oklahoma, is pursuing criminal charges against a local shop owner and several of his clerks for selling glass pipes.

But the shop owner and his clerks, including a popular local city councilman, are fighting back.

The case has already resulted in a hung jury and an acquittal. The defendants have refused plea deals. And they're backed by a national individual liberty group that says law enforcement should quit wasting taxpayers' time and money.

A third trial began this week.

The prosecutor's determination has puzzled some residents of the left-leaning town, as other states ease penalties for marijuana use or legalize the drug altogether.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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