So the eclipse has happened - what do I do with my glasses? - KSWO, Lawton, OK- Wichita Falls, TX: News, Weather, Sports. ABC, 24/7, Telemundo -

So the eclipse has happened - what do I do with my glasses?

In Columbia, thousands watched as the moon covered the sun for more than two minutes. (Source: WIS) In Columbia, thousands watched as the moon covered the sun for more than two minutes. (Source: WIS)
(WIS) -

The eclipse has come and gone - and all you're left with is grainy cell phone pictures and your eclipse glasses. 

Since you've already shared your eclipse photos here, you're probably asking yourself this, "What do I do with my eclipse glasses?" 

Well, you have a few options: 

  • You could reuse them: Keep them safe and out of harm's way and you can reuse them indefinitely, NASA says. Some glasses may have warnings to toss them after three years, - but NASA says that warning is outdated. JUST REMEMBER: the glasses have to have the ISO 12312-2 safety standard and the filters on the eyewear cannot be scratched, punctured, or torn. As always, check with the American Astronomical Society's list of Reputable Vendors of Solar Filters and Viewers. 
  • You could recycle them: Groups like Astronomers without Borders or South Carolina's Midlands Astronomy Club are accepting donations of eclipse glasses so they can be used at schools and in other countries, or be redistributed. For example, AWB is collecting protective eyewear to be redistributed to underserved schools in South America and Asia for the 2019 eclipse, their website says. 

The next total solar eclipse to cross over the United States will be in 2024. 

Copyright 2017 WIS. All rights reserved. 

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