City of Duncan discussing finance options to repair streets - KSWO 7News | Breaking News, Weather and Sports

City of Duncan discussing finance options to repair streets

(Source KSWO) (Source KSWO)

DUNCAN, OK (KSWO) -If you live in Duncan, you've probably used to dodging potholes and getting rattled by bumps and cracks on city streets. The City of Duncan is starting to look for money to fix the streets. A recent survey of the city's road conditions showed 92 percent of them are rated 'fair' or worse.
But the City's Public Works Director said it'll take several million dollars to fix them.

"Right around 73 million dollars," said Henry.

That's the cost to upgrade and fix the streets in Duncan. There's over 3 million square yards of pavement in the city that's in failed, poor, or good condition. At the last city council meeting Public Works Director Alex Henry discussed different ways to finance the repairs.

 "We have a current capital improvement tax which it funds all of the cities capital improvement so whether that be  water streets, the electrical distribution center equipment for the firefighters and the police department come out of there so that's a city tax which we could use some of that  and we would use some of that for this project," said Henry.

Henry said the money from that tax wouldn't come anywhere close to the 73 million they need. They are also going to apply for grants, but he said most of the money could come from a bond proposal, but a decision on that proposal would have to be voted on by residents.

Four years ago, voters in Duncan rejected a hike in property taxes to raise 9-million dollars to fix their streets. In 2007, voters rejected a similar proposal for road improvements.

"It would be great to get some backing because obviously its not free. Somewhere in the neighborhood to 300 to 350 dollars per linear foot of road to construct a city of Duncan standard road. Every foot that you travel down is 350 dollars to reconstruct. Its going to take some buy in from the population to make the investment to get the streets back to where they need to be," said Henry.

Residential streets like West Jefferson and Woodlawn Avenue, and 13th Street South in Duncan need attention.

"We will call them repeat offenders where they are regularly filling potholes and just trying to do patchwork and maintain them to where are travel-able they are not going to be glamorous they are going to be rough a lot of those have been identified that they need a complete reconstruction,: said Henry.

Henry said he has already received positive feedback from people in the community but you can still provide more feedback on the project. You can find  a full list of all the streets and their condition on the city's website. Its DuncanOK.gov.

Henry said over the next few months he will talk with city council members to discuss the best plan to fix the streets.

Copyright 2017 KSWO. All rights reserved.

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