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The Latest: Trump lawyer denies financial record subpoena

( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File). FILE - In this Nov. 2, 2017, file photo, Paul Manafort accompanied by his lawyers, arrives at U.S. Federal Court, in Washington. Prosecutors working for special counsel Robert Mueller say Manafort has been working on... ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File). FILE - In this Nov. 2, 2017, file photo, Paul Manafort accompanied by his lawyers, arrives at U.S. Federal Court, in Washington. Prosecutors working for special counsel Robert Mueller say Manafort has been working on...
(AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File). FILE - In this Oct. 28, 2013, file photo, former FBI Director Robert Mueller is seated before President Barack Obama and FBI Director James Comey arrive at an installation ceremony at FBI Headquarters in Washington. A... (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File). FILE - In this Oct. 28, 2013, file photo, former FBI Director Robert Mueller is seated before President Barack Obama and FBI Director James Comey arrive at an installation ceremony at FBI Headquarters in Washington. A...
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WASHINGTON (AP) - The Latest on the Russia probe (all times local):

4 p.m.

A lawyer for President Donald Trump says it's not true that special counsel Robert Mueller has subpoenaed financial records relating to the president.

In a statement Tuesday, attorney Jay Sekulow says such reporting is "false" and says "no subpoena has been issued or received."

He says he's confirmed "this with the bank and other sources."

Sekulow was responding to a report from German business newspaper Handelsblatt that Mueller had subpoenaed records from Deutsche Bank as part of his investigation into possible Russian involvement in the U.S. presidential election campaign.

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11:10 a.m.

A federal judge has ordered Paul Manafort to prove that he did not violate a court order, after prosecutors revealed that he has been working on an op-ed essay with a colleague alleged to have ties to Russian intelligence.

In a court filing, prosecutors say the attempt to publish an op-ed appeared to violate an admonishment from the judge last month to refrain from public statements. They are urging the judge to reject Manafort's petition to alter the terms of his current home confinement.

Manafort is facing felony charges involving allegations of money laundering and other financial crimes related to work in Ukraine. Manafort was working to secure his release from home confinement by posting more than $10 million in bond. He had reached a tentative agreement with the government.

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10:35 a.m.

Special counsel Robert Mueller's office spent $3.2 million during the first few months of his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump.

In addition, the Justice Department has spent $3.5 million to support the investigation, though the special counsel's office says that money would have been spent anyway if Mueller had not been appointed. Mueller incorporated several ongoing investigations within the Justice Department including those of Trump campaign contacts with Russia, former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort's business activities and former national security adviser Michael Flynn.

The details of the expenditures related to Mueller's investigation were laid out in a copy of the report obtained by The Associated Press, which was subsequently released publicly by the special counsel's office. The report covers from May 17, the date of Mueller's appointment, through Sept. 30, the end of the federal fiscal year.

Mueller's office says in the report that about $1.7 million was for salary and benefits, and more than $223,000 was spent on travel-related expenses. Despite the international focus of Mueller's probe, only about $2,800 was spent on actual travel costs. The rest was spent on the relocation of Justice Department employees temporarily assigned to the expanding investigation, the report shows.

So far, the special counsel has charged four people as part of the investigation including Manafort and Flynn.

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Associated Press writer Stephen Braun contributed to this report.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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