Testimony in Kelly Fairchild's murder trial begins in Hobart - KSWO 7News | Breaking News, Weather and Sports

Testimony in Kelly Fairchild's murder trial begins in Hobart

The testimony in the Kelly Fairchild murder trial started on Wednesday in Hobart. (Source KSWO) The testimony in the Kelly Fairchild murder trial started on Wednesday in Hobart. (Source KSWO)
HOBART, Ok (RNN Texoma) -

Day one of testimony in the murder trial of Kelly Fairchild is now complete at the Kiowa County Courthouse.

Fairchild is charged with first-degree murder for the 2015 death of her then 18-month-old son, Lane Fairchild. Investigators believe Fairchild and her boyfriend, Gregory Miller Jr., were responsible for Lane's death. Miller has already been found guilty of Child Abuse. 

It was a jampacked day at the Kiowa County Courthouse as nine witnesses took the stand. Witnesses included two Frederick hospital workers, three police officers, a child abuse expert and two members of Lane Fairchild's family, including his father. 

Testimony began with two employees at Frederick Memorial Hospital who say they were working the night Lane was brought in. Those employees both testified that when Lane came into the hospital, his body was ice cold and had no pulse, which led them to believe he had been dead for a while. They also testified that they noticed several cuts and bruises on Lane's face and head. 

Those two, as well as two Frederick police officers, all testified about what they felt were odd reactions by Fairchild and Miller. They all said Miller seemed agitated and repeatedly said that his dog must have smothered Lane.

But they said Kelly was expressionless, seeming indifferent to the entire situation and not talking at all. In cross-examination, the defense focused on the fact that people deal with trauma differently, saying that none of them knew Kelly personally, therefore they could not possibly know how she deals with trauma.

Another Frederick police officer testified that he saw Lane with his grandmother just two days before his death. He said he did not notice any cuts or bruises and appeared to be smiling and very happy.

Testimony from Lane's grandmother, Lisa Bradley, corroborated that story, with her adding that later that evening, the night of February 25, Kelly came by her house to pick up Lane. She walked through pictures that were taken that day that showed no cuts or bruises on Lane. Those pictures were then compared to graphic pictures taken of Lane just two days later, following his death. 

Lane's father, Blake Fairchild, also testified Wednesday, saying that he had also seen Lane on the 25th before Kelly picked him up. He said he had no idea Lane was being taken back to Miller's house and that he had told her several times to not take him there. Both Blake and Bradley also testified that after Lane's death leading up to the funeral, it was very difficult for them to get in touch with Kelly. 

The day's last witness was Ronnie Webb, a Child Welfare Supervisor who interviewed Kelly a week after Lane's death. He said they found drugs and several dangerous items on the floor where Lane was sleeping at Miller's home, which greatly concerned them. But he said that did not seem to concern Kelly. He also said that during that interview with Kelly, she described Lane as annoying and said that Miller became scary when he got drunk, which was a nightly occurrence.

In the defense's cross-examination, they focused heavily on the fact that both Kelly and Miller agreed that Kelly was asleep when Lane's injuries occurred, therefore she was not the one responsible for them. 

Testimony will continue Thursday morning at 9 a.m. and is expected to go on for at least the rest of the week. 

Stay with 7News for more updates in the coming days.

Copyright 2018 RNN Texoma. All Rights Reserved.

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