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Weather FAQ

 

Q. WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A WATCH AND A WARNING?
A. A watch means that severe weather is possible in and close to the watch area. Watches are issued for a large area for a long period.  Just because a particular county may be under a watch, severe weather may not occur.  A warning means that severe weather is imminent or has been spotted.  You should take the necessary action to protect life and property.
   
   
Q. WHY DO YOU CUT INTO PROGRAMMING?
A. Our goal is keep programming running as long as possible. But when LIFE-THREATENING severe weather is moving through part of our viewing area, the policy of  7NEWS and SkyWARN 7 Weather is to cut into programming and alert the people in the path of the severe weather. The smaller the severe weather event the less interruptionswe will make. Some larger events, such as tornado outbreaks, will require extended coverage.
   
   
Q. YOU CUT IN FOR AREAS THAT ARE FAR AWAY FROM LAWTON.   WHY?
A. We cover a large area of Southwest Oklahoma and Western North Texas.  We treat all counties equally because every person is of equal value.  SkyWARN 7 Weather does not see any state lines.  It may seem unfair when we cut into your show to warn people in the path of a storm who live 100 miles from you.  But remember, the day will come when those viewers will return the favor and patiently wait while we will interrupt their show to warn you.
   
   
Q. IF MY POWER GOES OUT, HOW CAN I GET WEATHER INFORMATION?
A. Cameron University's Public Radio Station, KCCU, carries our severe weather coverage when we do extended coverage.  KCCU is also a reliable source when you are away from your television.  Plus, you can purchase a battery-powered television so you can monitor our broadcasts when your power goes out.   Having a NOAA Weather Radio is another good idea.  They are available at most electronic stores.
   
   
Q. IS YOUR FORECAST ON ANY RADIO STATION LIKE WE HEAR FROM OTHER TELEVISION STATIONS?
A. Not only do they cover our severe weather coverage, but SkyWARN 7 Weather is partnered with KCCU radio to bring you the forecast in the morning and afternoon drive time periods.  Our forecasts will air from 6-9am on "Morning Edition" and from 4-7pm during "All Things Considered."  KCCU has transmitters in Lawton (89.3 and 102.9 FM), Altus (90.1 FM), Ardmore (90.3 FM), Clinton/Elk City,Weatherford (89.1 FM) and in Wichita Falls (88.7 FM).
   
   
Q. MY CHILD IS SCARED BY THE SEVERE WEATHER BULLETINS YOU PUT ON THE AIR. WHAT SHOULD I DO ABOUT THAT?
A. Reassure your children.  Make sure they know that you are aware of the threat and that you'll be protecting them in the event of an emergency.  It's a good idea to watch the severe weather coverage with your children and talk about what is happening.  Even though we live in "Tornado Alley" it is still very rare to have a tornado pass directly overhead.  Plus, if your children know what to do if they are at home alone during a storm, they might feel more secure during all times of severe weather.
   
   
Q. I WANT TO BE A STORMCHASER.  WHAT SHOULD I DO?
A. Stormchasing is EXTREMELY dangerous and should be left to trained professionals.  There has yet to be a fatality due to stormchasing but that day will likely come. Roads become congested with people driving toward tornadoes and this creates a hazard for emergency officials who are trying to perform rescues or other duties after a tornado.  If you would like to learn how to become a storm spotter for the National Weather Service in Norman, OK, contact them to find when and where their next spotter training class will be held.  Their number is (405) 325-3816.
   
   
Q. I WANT TO BE A METEOROLOGIST.  WHAT CLASSES SHOULD I TAKE, AND WHAT SCHOOLS DO YOU RECOMMEND?
A. Our best recommendation is to take as much math and science as you can while in high school to prepare you for meteorological courses in college.  Your choice of college depends on what you want to specialize in.  In our opinion, the University of Oklahoma may be the best choice if you are interested in severe weather and/or research.  Texas Tech University is a good school for research.  Texas A&M University will provide a well-rounded meteorological education.  Texas A&M will also provide some training for those who want to be broadcast meteorologists.  Mississippi State University also provides good training for broadcast meteorologists.
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
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