High turnover rate for 911 dispatchers - KSWO 7News | Breaking News, Weather and Sports

High turnover rate for 911 dispatchers

LAWTON-- A recent study says 911 dispatchers are in need nationwide. Long hours, stressful situations, and not enough bodies to take emergency calls have led to high turnover rates.  

Paula Pierce a supervisor at the Lawton dispatch center says she believes the study is true, due to the stressful calls the dispatch centers deal with.  Pierce says at times it's overwhelming when every light on your screen lights up, while other times you may go without a call for 30 minutes.  She says you have to really like what you do. For her it's a way to help the community.

Emergency dispatchers train on the job for six months and then they cross train to work everyones job within the dispatch center. Pierce says some of the calls they deal with on a daily basis are tough. Calls can go from a shooting to a backed up sewer in seconds. And if they weren't already busy enough, the dispatch center also takes non-emergency calls for the city. Pierce says, "we get the water, the sewer, the garbage, people who have broken pipes."

Stephanie Henderson is another dispatcher in Lawton and says they even take 911 calls from other states. She says it can be very overwhelming especially for individuals that don't have some type of background in any kind of law enforcement or medical areas.

 

 

  • Local NewsNewsMore>>

  • In reversal, Trump signs order stopping family separation

    In reversal, Trump signs order stopping family separation

    Wednesday, June 20 2018 11:21 AM EDT2018-06-20 15:21:21 GMT
    Wednesday, June 20 2018 4:36 PM EDT2018-06-20 20:36:52 GMT
    A boy stares out of a heavily tinted bus window leaving a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility Tuesday in McAllen, TX. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)A boy stares out of a heavily tinted bus window leaving a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility Tuesday in McAllen, TX. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    Trump signs executive order to keep families together at border, says 'zero-tolerance' prosecution policy will continue.

    Trump signs executive order to keep families together at border, says 'zero-tolerance' prosecution policy will continue.

  • More details released about man suspected of robbing Peach Orchard, other businesses

    More details released about man suspected of robbing Peach Orchard, other businesses

    Wednesday, June 20 2018 4:34 PM EDT2018-06-20 20:34:02 GMT
    Bowling is suspected in multiple robberies across Texoma, including two in Jefferson County. (Source MCSO)Bowling is suspected in multiple robberies across Texoma, including two in Jefferson County. (Source MCSO)
    Bowling is suspected in multiple robberies across Texoma, including two in Jefferson County. (Source MCSO)Bowling is suspected in multiple robberies across Texoma, including two in Jefferson County. (Source MCSO)

    39-year-old Melvin Mark Dewayne Bowling was taken into custody in Cooke County, Texas on Sunday, June 17 after he allegedly ran from police in Bowie the previous night.

    39-year-old Melvin Mark Dewayne Bowling was taken into custody in Cooke County, Texas on Sunday, June 17 after he allegedly ran from police in Bowie the previous night.

  • Compulsive video-game playing could be mental health problem

    Compulsive video-game playing could be mental health problem

    Monday, June 18 2018 5:20 AM EDT2018-06-18 09:20:00 GMT
    Wednesday, June 20 2018 4:04 PM EDT2018-06-20 20:04:30 GMT
    In its latest revision to an international disease classification manual, the U.N. health agency said Monday that classifying "Gaming Disorder" as a separate condition will 'serve a public health purpose for countries.' (Source: Pixabay)In its latest revision to an international disease classification manual, the U.N. health agency said Monday that classifying "Gaming Disorder" as a separate condition will 'serve a public health purpose for countries.' (Source: Pixabay)

    The World Health Organization says that compulsively playing video games now qualifies as a new mental health condition, in a move that some critics warn may risk stigmatizing its young players.

    The World Health Organization says that compulsively playing video games now qualifies as a new mental health condition, in a move that some critics warn may risk stigmatizing its young players.

Powered by Frankly