Too many jobs, not enough workers - KSWO 7News | Breaking News, Weather and Sports

Too many jobs, not enough workers

Lawton--It seems everywhere you look in Lawton, there are help wanted signs.  Employers are looking for workers.  You would think that the unemployment rate here would be relatively high, but it's just the opposite.  Comanche County is seeing its lowest unemployment rates in a long time.

The national average is 5.5%. 

In Oklahoma, it's 4.1%.  

In Comanche County, the unemployment rate is 3.7%. 

  With so many folks working---why are there still so many jobs available?  A big reason is BRAC.  At least 12,000 soldiers and their families are expected to move here over the next few years.  So, businesses want to expand to handle that population growth.  But, they haven't arrived yet, so those employers are still looking to fill those jobs.

 Charles Sutterfield, the manager of the Oklahoma Workforce Center, says so many employers have already set up shop in anticipation of the growth spurt.  But so far, there's not enough people to fill positions. "There's going to be a gap while the population catches up," Sutterfield said.

 Another reason why so many folks are not taking advantage of the jobs out there, people are holding out for higher-paying jobs and passing on the minimum wage work, which makes up most of the available jobs.

  Sutterfield says, right now, the Lawton area will continue to see many jobs not filled.  That's because the BRAC families haven't even started moving into the area just yet.  Until that gap is filled, he feels employers will continue to look for help.

If you like to know where the jobs are in the Lawton area or see if your skills match up with a potential employer, you can go by the Workforce Center on 11th street, just south of Lee Boulevard.

  • Local NewsNewsMore>>

  • In reversal, Trump signs order stopping family separation

    In reversal, Trump signs order stopping family separation

    Wednesday, June 20 2018 11:21 AM EDT2018-06-20 15:21:21 GMT
    Wednesday, June 20 2018 4:24 PM EDT2018-06-20 20:24:12 GMT
    A boy stares out of a heavily tinted bus window leaving a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility Tuesday in McAllen, TX. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)A boy stares out of a heavily tinted bus window leaving a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility Tuesday in McAllen, TX. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    Trump signs executive order to keep families together at border, says 'zero-tolerance' prosecution policy will continue.

    Trump signs executive order to keep families together at border, says 'zero-tolerance' prosecution policy will continue.

  • Compulsive video-game playing could be mental health problem

    Compulsive video-game playing could be mental health problem

    Monday, June 18 2018 5:20 AM EDT2018-06-18 09:20:00 GMT
    Wednesday, June 20 2018 4:04 PM EDT2018-06-20 20:04:30 GMT
    In its latest revision to an international disease classification manual, the U.N. health agency said Monday that classifying "Gaming Disorder" as a separate condition will 'serve a public health purpose for countries.' (Source: Pixabay)In its latest revision to an international disease classification manual, the U.N. health agency said Monday that classifying "Gaming Disorder" as a separate condition will 'serve a public health purpose for countries.' (Source: Pixabay)

    The World Health Organization says that compulsively playing video games now qualifies as a new mental health condition, in a move that some critics warn may risk stigmatizing its young players.

    The World Health Organization says that compulsively playing video games now qualifies as a new mental health condition, in a move that some critics warn may risk stigmatizing its young players.

  • APNewsBreak: At least 3 shelters set up for child migrants

    APNewsBreak: At least 3 shelters set up for child migrants

    Tuesday, June 19 2018 9:12 PM EDT2018-06-20 01:12:25 GMT
    Wednesday, June 20 2018 4:04 PM EDT2018-06-20 20:04:23 GMT
    Nicole Hernandez, of the Mexican state of Guerrero, holds on to her mother as they wait with other families to request political asylum in the United States, across the border in Tijuana, Mexico, on Wednesday, June 13, 2018. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)Nicole Hernandez, of the Mexican state of Guerrero, holds on to her mother as they wait with other families to request political asylum in the United States, across the border in Tijuana, Mexico, on Wednesday, June 13, 2018. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

    Migrant babies and young children are being held in special "tender age" shelters after being taken from their parents at the US-Mexico border.

    Migrant babies and young children are being held in special "tender age" shelters after being taken from their parents at the US-Mexico border.

Powered by Frankly