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Former Comanche Chief of Police sentenced for embezzlement

Oklahoma City_Press Release_John C. Richter, United States Attorney for the Western District of Oklahoma, announced that RAY ANDERSON, 55, of Lawton, Oklahoma, the former Comanche Nation Police Chief, was sentenced yesterday by Chief United States District Judge Robin J. Cauthron to serve ten months in custody followed by two years of supervised release for embezzlement from the Comanche Nation.  The ten-month sentence is to be five months in prison followed by five months home confinement with possible electronic monitoring.  In addition, Judge Cauthron ordered Anderson to pay $50,949.18 in restitution to the Comanche Nation, which represents the amounts that Anderson unlawfully, and with tribal leader authorization, diverted into and through a bank account in Lawton.

"As Chief of Police, this defendant abused his position and the trust of the tribe he served," said U.S. Attorney John C. Richter. "The sentence in this case should serve not only as punishment for his crimes but also as a strong message of deterrence to those who may seek to use tribal funds as their own personal piggy bank. I want to commend FBI Special Agent Scott Chafin for his determined and thorough investigation."

Anderson pled guilty in February and agreed that the total loss amount to the Comanche Nation caused by his actions was $50,949.18.  Per the terms of the plea agreement, Anderson resigned as the Police Chief of the Comanche Nation and agreed that he abused his position of public trust.

This case was the result of an investigation conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation.  It was initiated by information received as a result of the FBI's toll-free number 1-877-OK-TRIBE (877-658-7423), which was established by the FBI in Oklahoma City in October of 2007 to provide a single place to report major crimes which have occurred on tribal land.

The case was prosecuted by U.S. Attorney John C. Richter.      

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